ST. LOUIS PUBLIC LIBRARY
PREMIER LIBRARY SOURCES
HOME KIDZONE CATALOG SEARCH BULLET


BULLET St. Louis Street Index
S - Street Names


Following is a list of currently existing (1994) St. Louis city streets which was compiled by Dr. Glen Holt and Thomas A. Pearson. Entries are alphabetical by street name, and include information on street orientation (east-west, north-south), street name origin, dedication date, and neighborhood(s) through which the street runs (when known).

SACRAMENTO AVENUE (E-W). When river man J. M. White laid out the 1859 subdivision of White Place, he named this street for the city of Sacramento, California. It was Middle Street from College to Clay until 1881 and Margaretta Avenue from Sarah to College until 1882. (Fairground)

SALENA STREET (N S). Named originally as Salena, probably for a female relative, in the 1856 subdivision of W. H. Mitchell in the Soulard area. "Salena" is a variant of "Selina," from the Greek "Selene," goddess of the moon. In the Marquette Cherokee neighborhood, sections of this street were named Iroquois and Oakland between President and Utah until 1881. At that time it became Capitol Avenue from Chippewa to Utah. It was renamed Salena in 1893. (Benton Park) (Marquette-Cherokee)

SALISBURY STREET (E-W). Honored Captain Philander Salisbury, the commander of Missouri troops in the Mexican War, when it appeared in Farrar's Addition of 1850. (Hyde Park & Bissell - College Hill)

SALOMA AVENUE (E-W). Appeared as a street name in Bircher's subdivision of 1906. It is a variant spelling of the name for the biblical character, Salome, daughter of King Herod. (Walnut Park)

SALZBURGER AVENUE (N-S). Originated in 1906 in the Austria Heights subdivision. The family name is derived either from one of the German places called Salzburg or from the capital city of the province of Salzburg in west-central Austria. The latter was the birthplace of the composer Mozart. "Salzburg" means "salt hill." (Morganford)

SAMUEL SHEPARD DRIVE (E-W). Named to honor the longtime superintendent of Banneker District Schools who was named Superintendent of Schools for East Chicago, Illinois in 1976. Dr. Shepard advocated what is known as compensatory education. (Midtown)

SAN BONITA AVENUE (E-W). Laid out in the 1917 subdivision of Hi-Pointe, it is derived from the Spanish word "bonita," meaning graceful. (Kingsbury)

SAN FRANCISCO AVENUE (E-W). Opened as a street in the White Place subdivision of 1859 and named for the city of San Francisco, California. The Golden Gate City took its name from Saint Francis of Assisi (1182-1226), "Italian friar and preacher and founder of the Franciscan order. The thoroughfare carried the name of Julius Street from College to Clay and Julia Avenue from Fair to Newstead, both until 1881. It was also Florence Avenue from Newstead to Cora and also from Euclid to Geraldine both until 1882. (Fairground)

SAN FRANCISCO COURT (N-S). In the San Francisco Court subdivision of 1957. Like the earlier street name, this title honored the city of San Francisco. (Fairground)

SAN JACINTO AVENUE (N-S). Originating in Shields' Second Forest Park Subdivision of 1888, its' name is borrowed from the San Jacinto River in Texas. (Oakland)

SAN JACINTO COURT (N-S). An extension of San Jacinto Avenue in the Louisville Heights Subdivision of 1946. (Oakland)

SAN JUAN AVENUE (N-S). Located in the 1898 Merchant's First subdivision, and meaning St. John in Spanish, it is named for the capital and chief city of Puerto Rico, captured by American troops in the Spanish-American War. (Baden-Riverview)

SANFORD AVENUE (N-S). "Sanford" ("sandy ford" is the name of several places in England and the city of Sanford, Florida. It originated in 1912 at Dale Avenue in the Glades subdivision. (Oakland)

SARAH STREET (N-S). Commemorates Mrs. Sarah C. Coleman, an heiress of the Lindell estate. It originated in Peter Lindell's Second Addition of 1865. Between present-day Aldine and Labadie Avenues, Sarah was known as Glendale Avenue until 1882. It was known as Bartle Avenue from Duncan to Manchester Road until 1891. (Central West End) (Fairground) (Grand Prairie) (Shaw)

SARPY AVENUE (N-S). Originating in the 1852 Rock Spring Addition, it was named to honor Gregoire Sarpy, an early French settler and land owner in St. Louis. In the Central West End, it was formerly Barrett Avenue from Sarah to Boyle until 1881. (Central West End) (Midtown)

SARSFIELD PLACE (E-W). Sarsfield is the name of several places in Ireland, and was the name of a St. Louis club for Irish Americans formed in September 1896. (Jeff-Vanderlou)

SAVOY COURT (E-W). "Savoy" is an Alpine region in eastern France which borders Italy and Switzerland. The name has been used often in the US and England to connote elegance and class. It occurred as a street name In the 1909 private subdivision of Savoy Court. (Cabanne)

SCANLAN AVENUE (E-W). First appeared on St. Louis maps in Christy's Subdivision of the Gratiot League Square in 1871 and was named in honor of Mrs. Mary F. Scanlan, a descendant of the Christy family and an heiress of the Wiggins Ferry Company estate. (Clifton) (The Hill)

SCHAEFFER PLACE (N-S). The name "Schaefer" is from England, meaning "one who took care of sheep, a shepherd." In the private Schaeffer subdivision of 1912. (Oakland)

SCHILLER AVENUE (E-W). Honors Friedrich von Schiller (1759-1805), German poet, dramatist, historian and philosopher in the 1868 Garden Suburb. (Baden-Riverview)

SCHILLER PLACE (E-W). In the Schiller Heights private subdivision of 1906, this street commemorated Friedrich von Schiller (1759-1805), the German poet, dramatist and philosopher. (Oak Hill)

SCHIRMER STREET (E W). Named for Charles Schirmer, who was elected as a councilman from the Third Ward in the first Carondelet city election on April 9, 1851. This name was applied to that section of street between the wharf and Ivory Avenue. From Ivory west to Grand Avenue, this street bore the name of Menkens Street until 1881, when it was changed to Schirmer. (*Carondelet) (Morganford)

SCHOLLMEYER AVENUE (E-W). When it was laid out in the 1910 Hadley Park Subdivision, it was named in honor of Adolph R. Schollmeyer, president of the A. R. Schollmeyer Real Estate Company. (Southwest)

SCHOOL STREET (E-W). Originating inn the Stoddard Addition of 1851, it was named for nearby public school property. (Old North St. Louis-Yeatman)

SCHROEDER PLACE (N-S). Extending from Primm to Alemania, it began as Kobermann Avenue in the Kobermann's subdivision of 1925 between Primm and Allemania streets. It was renamed as Schroeder Place in 1948. "Schroeder" originated in German as "one who made garments, a tailor;" or "one who drove a dray, a drayman." (Morganford)

SCOTT AVENUE (E-W). "Scott" is simply a variant spelling of "Scot," or one who came from Scotland. In the Scott Addition of 1856, it was named for the land owner and developer of the subdivision. (Central West End) (Midtown)

SCRANTON AVENUE (N-S) Probably named for Scranton, Pennsylvania, which was named for George W. Scranton, who founded an ironworks there in 1840. (Baden-Riverview)

SECOND STREET (N S). Originally known as La Rue d'Eglise (Church Street) in Colonial St. Louis, it became Second Street after the American takeover in 1804. The present name was adopted by city ordinance in 1826. In the Soulard neighborhood, Second was known as Columbus Street until 1883. In Marquette-Cherokee, it was named Columbus Street from the Marine Hospital to Rutger Street until 1883, when it received its present name. (Downtown) (Marquette-Cherokee) (Old North St. Louis-Yeatman) (Soulard)

SELBY PLACE (N-S). Bordering Carr Square on the west, it drew its name from the Selby urban district in Yorkshire, England. A Benedictine abbey was founded there in 1069 by a grant of William the Conqueror. Selby is said to have been the birthplace of King Henry I. Between Wash and Carr streets, it was called West Sixteenth Street until 1883. (Downtown)

SELLS AVENUE (E-W). Opened in Dwyer's Resubdivision of City Block 3830 of 1895, it was named for Miles Sells, an early landowner in the area. It was known as Kidd Court westwardly from Riverview until 1947. (Baden-Riverview)

SEMPLE AVENUE (N-S). Originating in the 1870 subdivision of Goodfellow Place, it honors Charles Semple, an early land owner in the vicinity. Between Easton Avenue and Natural Bridge Rand, this street was named Belleview Avenue until 1881. (Arlington) (Cabanne)

SENATE STREET (E W). Formerly Penn Street, this thoroughfare received its name in l94l to make it correspond to the nearby Congress Street, one block to the south. (Benton Park)

SERBIAN DRIVE (N-S). Was originally part of McNair Avenue; renamed Serbian Drive to honor the Eastern European country which has been the scene of so much violence in the 20th century. (Peabody Darst-Webbe)

SEVENTEENTH STREET (N-S). First appeared on maps of St. Louis in the early 1840s between Market and St. Charles within the 1844 subdivision of James H. Lucas. Other sections received the Seventeenth Street designation at later dates. Between Market and Clark, it was Moore Street until 1933. (Downtown) (Old North St. Louis-Yeatman)

SEVENTH STREET (N-S). Forming the city limits of St. Louis between 1822 and 1841, Seventh Street was established by city ordinance in 1826 following the numerical pattern for naming north-south streets. In the Soulard area, it was known as South Seventh Street. (Downtown) (Old North St. Louis-Yeatman) (Soulard)

SEXAUER AVENUE (N-S). Appearing in Sexauer's subdivision of 1892, it honors Edward Sexauer, a gardener in the area who was the land owner and developer. (Fairground)

SHARP AVENUE (N-S). Originally a private road to the Sharp family farm and residence, it was officially platted in the Sharp Place subdivision of 1950. (Morganford)

SHAW AVENUE (E-W). First appeared in the Hill community area as Phare Avenue in the 1868 subdivision of Fairmont Heights, named for a partner in the development. The section extending from Kingshighway to Sublette Avenue was renamed in honor of Henry Shaw in 1881. (The Hill)

SHAW BOULEVARD (E-W). Named in honor of Henry Shaw, the St. Louis merchant and philanthropist who founded the Missouri Botanical (Shaw's) Garden and who donated Tower Grove Park to the city of St. Louis. (Shaw)

SHAW PLACE (N-S). A private subdivision developed by Henry Shaw in 1880. It contained ten houses built in the English style under Shaw's supervision. The subdivision was bounded by Shaw boulevard, Mercy Street (now Spring Avenue) and De Tonty Street. Shaw Place was the only street in the development. (Shaw)

SHAWMUT PLACE (N-S). In the 1890 subdivision of Mount Gamble, it was named for a suburban district near New Bedford, Massachusetts. (Cabanne)

SHENANDOAH AVENUE (E W). When the St. Louis commons were surveyed in the 1836, what is now Shenandoah Avenue was the fourth lane running east and west. In the 1850s, when the

SHENANDOAH AVENUE (E-W) (continued) Commons was platted into city blocks for the sale of lots, it was decided to generally name the east west streets for Indian tribes or rivers. Shenandoah is named for a river in western Virginia. Until 1867, it was named Arrow Street between Broadway and Eighteenth Street. (Benton Park) (Compton Hill) (Shaw) (Soulard)

SHEPARD, SAMUEL DRIVE (E-W). See
SAMUEL SHEPARD DRIVE (E-W).

SHEPLEY DRIVE (E-W). Named to honor John R. Shepley, an early supporter of Washington University. Mr. Shepley founded the village of Highland, Missouri (it lay in the area now bounded by Jefferson, Laclede, and Leffingwell Avenues and Eugenia Street). (Baden-Riverview)

SHERIDAN AVENUE (E-W). Appearing in the Florence subdivision of 1853, it was named in honor of Philip Henry Sheridan (1831-1888), an outstanding Union Army cavalry general in the Civil War. It was known as Easton Street between Jefferson and Easton Avenues until 1867. (Old North St. Louis-Yeatman)

SHERMAN PLACE (E-W). Venerated William Tecumsch Sherman (1820-1891), Union Army general in the Civil War and later a St. Louis street railway magnate. It came into existence in Cline and Jamison's subdivision of 1883. (Fairground)

SHERRY AVENUE (E-W). In the 1906 subdivision of West Walnut Park, it was named for a wine from grapes grown in the region of Jerez de la Crontera,(sp) Spain. (Walnut Park)

SHIRLEY PLACE (E-W). "Shirley" is the name of several English places. It means a "wood belonging to the shire." Originated in the Bryan Park subdivision of 1914. (Fairground)

SHORT STREET (N-S). In the Lowell Addition of 1851, it was so named because of its one-block length. (Hyde Park & Bissell- College Hill)

SHREVE AVENUE (N-S). Honored Henry Miller Shreve (1783-1857), steamboat owner, inventor and river navigation authority, when it was opened as part of the subdivision of the Shreve Estate in 1869. It was Marcus Avenue from Natural Bridge to West Florissant to 1926. (Fairground) (Walnut Park)

SHULTE AVENUE (E-W). "Shulte" is a variant spelling of "Schulte," which in turn is a form of "Schultz," meaning "magistrate or sheriff; a steward or overseer." It appeared in the 1906 subdivision of West Walnut Park. (Walnut Park)

SIDNEY STREET (E-W). Named for Sarah Sidney Carr Lane, daughter of Dr. William Carr Lane, first mayor of St. Louis. When he laid out the suburb of St. George, an 1836 addition along the southern riverfront, he named its streets after his children. (Benton Park) (Compton Hill) (Soulard)

SIEMERS LANE (N-S). Commemorated Fred Siemers, an owner of extensive land-holdings, when Charles Semple laid out the subdivision of Marais Castor (Beaver Swamp) in 1860. (Arlington)

SIGEL AVENUE (E-W). Honors Franz Sigel (1824-1902), a Union Army general in the Civil War, who fought in Missouri and at the Battle of Bull Run. He was born in Germany and was an idol of the German population of St. Louis. Appeared in the Goethe Heights Subdivision of 1909. (Oak Hill)

SIMPSON AVENUE (E-W). In the Clifton Heights Subdivision of 1885, it honored Dr. Robert Simpson, an early St. Louis postmaster and army officer. (Clifton)

SIMPSON PLACE (N S). Named for a partner in the iron manufacturing firm of Christopher and Simpson (William Simpson). He purchased the Bredell property in 1892 and sold the northeast corner of the tract to his brother in law, Jacob Christopher. After razing the old Bredell mansion, Simpson laid out a street across the tract and gave it his name. He then built a home on the northeast corner. His home closely matched Christopher's house. (Lafayette Square)

SIMPSON TERRACE (E-W). Ward 24, Precinct 12, Census Tract 1036. (Clifton Heights)

SINGLETON STREET (E-W). First appeared on city maps in 1855 and possibly named for John H. and Benjamin R. Singleton, who operated the Pacific Foundry beginning in 1854, or for the architect Henry Singleton, who designed the Old Courthouse. (Downtown)

SIXTEENTH STREET (N-S). The section of Sixteenth Street south of Clark Avenue was called Skinner Street in John P. Reilly's Addition of 1836. It first appeared under its present name in James H. Lucas' addition of 1844, designating the section between Market and St. Charles Streets. Other portions of this downtown street received that name somewhat later. In the Downtown area, it was Seventeenth Street from Washington Avenue to Chambers Street until 1883. (Downtown) (Old North St. Louis-Yeatman)

SIXTH STREET (N S). This street was established and named by the general street ordinance of 1826. Between Rutger Street and Park Avenue, it was named Phoenix Street until 1881. (Downtown) (Old North St. Louis-Yeatman) (Soulard)

SKINKER BOULEVARD (N-S). Honors Thomas S. Skinker who formerly owned a large tract of land west of Forest Park. It was called Skinker Road until 1925. (Cabanne) (Kingsbury)

SLATTERY STREET (N-S). Appearing in Cutter's subdivision of the Penrose Tract of 1869, it honors Dennis P. Slattery, secretary of the company, which erected the first grain elevator in St. Louis at the foot of Biddle Street in 1865. It was known as Quincy Street from Benton to Montgomery until 1881. (Old North St. Louis-Yeatman)

SMILEY AVENUE (E-W). Platted in the 1892 Smiley's Subdivision and was named for Charles D. Smiley, the assistant treasurer of the Simmons Hardware Company. (Clifton)

SMITH STREET (E-W). In the Smith, Bates and Lisa Addition of 1843, it honors William Smith, landowner and developer, who was an early day merchant in St. Louis. (Old North St. Louis-Yeatman)

SOPER STREET (E W). Initially L Street in the old town of Carondelet, this street was christened as Lafayette Street in 1854 by the city of Carondelet. In 1881, the city of St. Louis, which had annexed Carondelet in 1870, renamed it to honor A. W. Soper, general manager of the St. Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern Railroad Company. Platted from the wharf to Michigan Avenue, the street was vacated between Broadway and Minnesota Avenue for use by St. Joseph's Academy. (Carondelet)

SOULARD STREET (E W). This street and the Soulard Neighborhood are named for Antoine Soulard, who was the second surveyor-general of Upper Louisiana Territory during the Spanish regime. Originally the riverfront tract belonged to Gabriel Cerre; the land was inherited by his daughter, Julia, who married Soulard in 1795. (Soulard)

SOUTH BENVENUE DRIVE (N-S). See
BENVENUE DRIVE (N-S).

SOUTH BEAUMONT STREET (N-S). See BEAUMONT STREET (N-S).

SOUTH BOYLE AVENUE (N-S). See BOYLE AVENUE (N-S).

SOUTH BROADWAY STREET (N-S). See BROADWAY (N-S).

SOUTH CALVARY AVENUE (N-S). Just before reaching Broadway, Calvary Avenue splits into a northermost and a southernmost leg. South Calvary Avenue is the southernmost leg of this street, which is named for the cemetery it passes through. See also CALVARY AVENUE (N-S). (North Riverfront)

SOUTH CARDINAL AVENUE (N-S). See CARDINAL AVENUE (N-S).

SOUTH COMMERCIAL STREET (N-S). See COMMERCIAL STREET (N-S).

SOUTH COMPTON AVENUE (N-S). See COMPTON AVENUE (N-S).

SOUTH COURT (N-S). In Dameron's Subdivision of 1916, it was part of the Buckingham Court development. (Central West End)

SOUTH CUBA COURT (N-S). See CUBA COURT (N-S).

SOUTH DAKOTA STREET (N-S). See DAKOTA STREET (N-S).

SOUTH DRIVE (E-S). Within Tower Grove Park, this street extends westward from Tower Grove Avenue. (Shaw)

SOUTH EIGHTEENTH STREET (N-S). See EIGHTEENTH STREET (N-S).

SOUTH EIGHTH STREET (N-S). See EIGHTH STREET (N-S).

SOUTH ELEVENTH STREET (N-S). See ELEVENTH STREET (N-S).

SOUTH EUCLID AVENUE (N-S). See EUCLID AVENUE (N-S).

SOUTH EWING AVENUE (N-S). See EWING AVENUE (N-S).

SOUTH FIFTEENTH STREET (N-S). See FIFTEENTH STREET (N-S).

SOUTH FIRST STREET (N-S). See FIRST STREET (N-S).

SOUTH FOURTEENTH STREET (N-S). See FOURTEENTH STREET (N-S).

SOUTH FOURTH STREET (N-S). See FOURTH STREET (N-S).

SOUTH GARRISON AVENUE (N-S). See GARRISON AVENUE (N-S).

SOUTH GASCONADE STREET (N-S). See GASCONADE STREET (N-S).

SOUTH GRAND BOULEVARD (N-S). See GRAND AVENUE and BOULEVARD (E-W) and (N-S).

SOUTH JEFFERSON AVENUE (N-S). See JEFFERSON AVENUE (N-S).

SOUTH KINGSHIGHWAY BOULEVARD (N-S). See KINGSHIGHWAY BOULEVARD (N-S).

SOUTH LEFFINGWELL AVENUE (N-S). See LEFFINGWELL AVENUE (N-S).

SOUTH LENORE K. SULLIVAN BOULEVARD (N-S). See LENORE K. SULLIVAN BOULEVARD (N-S).

SOUTH LEONARD AVENUE (N-S). See LEONARD AVENUE (N-S).

SOUTH MAGNOLIA AVENUE (N-S). See MAGNOLIA AVENUE (N-S).

SOUTH MARKET STREET (N-S). See MARKET STREET (E-W).

SOUTH MEMORIAL DRIVE (N-S). See MEMORIAL DRIVE (N-S).

SOUTH MONTGOMERY STREET (N-S). See MONTGOMERY STREET (N-S).

SOUTH NEWSTEAD AVENUE (N-S). See NEWSTEAD AVENUE (N-S).

SOUTH NINTH STREET (N-S). See NINTH STREET (N-S).

SOUTH NORWOOD AVENUE (N-S). See NORWOOD AVENUE (N-S).

SOUTH PARK COURT (N-S). So named for its location south of nearby Carondelet Park. (Carondelet)

SOUTH ROSEBURY AVENUE (E-W). At its westernmost edge Rosebury Avenue splits into two legs. South Rosebury Avenue is the southernmost leg. See also ROSEBURY AVENUE (E-W). (Kingsbury)

SOUTH SARAH STREET (N-S). See SARAH STREET (N-S).

SOUTH SECOND STREET (N-S). See SECOND STREET (N-S).

SOUTH SEVENTEENTH STREET (N-S). See SEVENTEENTH STREET (N-S).

SOUTH SEVENTH STREET (N-S). See SEVENTH STREET (N-S).

SOUTH SIXTEENTH STREET (N-S). See SIXTEENTH STREET (N-S).

SOUTH SIXTH STREET (N-S). See SIXTH STREET (N-S).

SOUTH SKINKER BOULEVARD (N-S). See SKINKER BOULEVARD and PARKWAY (N-S).

SOUTH SPRING AVENUE (N-S). See SPRING AVENUE (N-S).

SOUTH TAYLOR AVENUE (N-S). See TAYLOR AVENUE (N-S).

SOUTH TENTH STREET (N-S). See TENTH STREET(N-S).

SOUTH THERESA AVENUE (N-S). See THERESA AVENUE (N-S).

SOUTH THIRTEENTH STREET (N-S). See THIRTEENTH STREET (N-S).

SOUTH TRUDEAU STREET (N-S). See TRUDEAU STREET (N-S).

SOUTH TUCKER BOULEVARD (N-S). See TUCKER BOULEVARD (N-S).

SOUTH TWELFTH STREET (N-S). A section of Tucker Boulevard (formerly Twelfth Street) which is cut off from Tucker by the I-44 and I-55 interchanges at Geyer Avenue and thus was not renamed. See also TUCKER BOULEVARD (N-S). (Soulard)

SOUTH TWENTIETH STREET (N-S). See TWENTIETH STREET (N-S).

SOUTH TWENTY-FIRST STREET (N-S). See TWENTY-FIRST STREET (N-S).

SOUTH TWENTY-SECOND STREET (N-S). See TWENTY-SECOND STREET (N-S).

SOUTH TWENTY-THIRD STREET (N-S). See TWENTY-THIRD STREET (N-S).

SOUTH UTAH PLACE (N-S). See UTAH PLACE (N-S).

SOUTH VANDEVENTER AVENUE (N-S). See VANDEVENTER AVENUE (N-S).

SOUTHLAND AVENUE (N-S). Located in the St. Louis Hills Number 4 Subdivision of 1946, it was given its name by the developer, the Willmore Organization. (Southwest)

SOUTHWEST AVENUE (E-W). From Kingshighway to the city limits was known as Old Manchester Road until 1917, when it was renamed as Southwest Avenue. (Clifton) (The Hill) (Oakland)

SOUTHWOOD AVENUE (E-W). In the De Mun Park apartment subdivision of 1923, it was so named by the developer. (Kingsbury)

SOUTHWORTH COURT (N-S). So named by the developer, who was apparently a raging Anglophile (a nearby street is named Hamlet Street). (Baden-Riverview)

SPRING AVENUE (N-S). Took its name from a spring near Fairground Park near Natural Bridge Road in north St. Louis, which was the source of Rocky Branch Creek. Until 1893, a section of this street in the Shaw area was known as Cabanne Street. Another section, that between Shaw Boulevard and McRee Avenue, was named by Henry Shaw as Morisse Street to honor his brother-in-law. It was renamed Spring Avenue in 1881. Until 1881, it was Morrow Avenue from Gravois to Arsenal and Gregor Street from Chippewa to Tholozan. It was also Olivia Street from Meramec to Itaska until 1925. (Fairground) (Grand Prairie) (Midtown) (Oak Hill) (Shaw)

SPRING DRIVE (E-W). In the Riverview Gardens subdivision of 1917, it was named for a nearby spring in the river bluff. (Baden-Riverview)

SPRING GARDEN DRIVE (N-S). Appearing in the Glasgow Woods subdivision of 1928, it is an example of a subdivision promotional name. It was a 60 foot wide road from Riverview to the city limits until 1931. (Baden-Riverview)

SPROULE AVENUE (N-S). Originating in Laclede J. Howard's subdivision of 1909, it honors Andrew Sproule, a partner in the Samuel C. Davis Dry Goods Company. (Oakland)

SPRUCE STREET (E-W). This unnamed colonial cross-street was called South "D" Street beginning in 1821 and was given its present name as part of the general street ordinance of 1826. (Downtown)

ST. ALPHONSUS STREET (N-S). So named because of its proximity to the nearby St. Alphonsus (Rock) Roman Catholic Church on Grand Boulevard. The church was dedicated on August 4, 1872. St. Alphonsus Maria de Liguori was founder of the Redemptionist Order in Scala, Italy, in 1732, a result of his experience in evangelistic work among the poor. (Grand Prairie)

ST. ANGE AVENUE and COURT (N S). Commemorates Captain Louis St. Ange de Bellerive, formerly commandant of the garrison of Fort Chartres, who moved his men to St. Louis in 1765 and headed the government there until 1769. (Soulard)

ST. BERNARD'S LANE (N-S). Began as Hawk Avenue in the Rock Springs Addition of 1852 between Clayton Road and Gratiot Street. It received its present name in 1956 in honor of nearby Catholic Church of St. Bernard, Abbott. (Central West End)

ST. CHARLES STREET (E-W). Designated early in St. Louis history as the road to St. Charles. (Downtown) (Midtown)

ST. CYR AVENUE (E-W). In the 1894 Burke's subdivision of Prospect Hill, it is named for former landowner, Paschall Hyacinthe St. Cyr. It was known as Ann Avenue from Riverview to the city limits until 1881. (Baden-Riverview)

ST. EDWARD AVENUE (E-W). Originating in Kroe- ger's subdivision of 1909, it was named for the nearby Roman Catholic church of St. Edward the King. (Arlington)

ST. ELIZABETH'S ACADEMY PLACE (N-S). Named for the parochial school which it fronts (this street was formerly part of Tennessee Avenue). (Tower Grove East)

ST. FERDINAND AVENUE and ST. FERDINAND PLACE (E-W). These streets honor St. Ferdinand, who as Spanish King Ferdinand III (1199-1270) was canonized for driving the infidel Moors from his country. (Grand Prairie)

ST. GEORGE STREET (E W). Named for the suburb of St. George, an 1836 development by William Carr Lane, first mayor of St. Louis. The tract previously was owned by the Vasquez and Delassus families. (Soulard)

ST. JAMES SQUARE (E-W). Appeared in the 1891 subdivision of Greenwood, it was named after St. James's Square in London, England, the location of St. James's Palace ("St. James's" is how "St. James" should be spelled). (Oakland) (Southwest)

ST. LOUIS AVENUE (E-W). In William Christy's addition of 1842, it was named to honor Saint Louis, King Louis IX of France (1214-1270), the patron saint of the city. From Prairie Avenue westward to Belt Avenue, St. Louis Avenue was known as Claggett Avenue until 1888. Hezekiah Claggett was a landowner who subdivided tracts in the area. This street was called Grande Avenue from Fifteenth Street to Grand Avenue until 1871 and was Spring Street from the Wharf to Fifteenth Street until 1875. (Arlington) (Fairground) (Grand Prairie) (Old North St. Louis-Yeatman)

ST. MARYS DRIVE (E-W). Named for St. Mary's High School, which this street fronts. (Dutchtown South)

ST. VINCENT AVENUE and COURT (E-W). This street was named in the 1888 subdivision of the former St. Vincent Catholic Cemetery, which was located at the southwest corner of Park and Jefferson Avenues. Between Pennsylvania and Theresa avenues, this street was named Mary Ann until 1888. (Compton Hill)

STADIUM PLAZA (N-S). Formerly South Seventh Street between Walnut and Spruce, this street borders Busch Memorial Stadium on the west. It was named at the time of the construction of the stadium in 1966. (Downtown)

STANLEY AVENUE (E-W). Appeared in the 1885 subdivision of Blendon Place to honor James Stanley, then the postmaster at Cheltenham. (Oakland)

STANSBURY STREET (E W). Named for Ira Stansbury, one of the developers in the Kalbfleisch and Stansbury's Subdivision of 1882. (Marquette-Cherokee)

STEFFENS AVENUE (N-S). Originating in the private Brockett Place Subdivision of 1910, it was named for Edward Steffens, who owned and developed it. (Oak Hill)

STEINLAGE DRIVE (N-S). Named for Adolph A. Steinlage, its developer. He was the president of the Steinlage Real Estate and Investment Company. It appeared in Steinlage's subdivision of 1928. (Fairground)

STEINS STREET (E W). Called Steins Street between the wharf and Michigan Avenue to honor Jacob Steins, an early German settler of Carondelet. He arrived in 1846 and in the ensuing years was influential in causing many Germans to settle in a section that came to be known as Stein's Town. From Michigan to Grand Avenue, Steins Street was known as Heavens Street until 1881. (Carondelet) (Morganford)

STEPHEN AVENUE (N-S). Part of the 1923 subdivision of Submoor, it was named for David Stephen, an architect with the firm of William B. Ittner, architects. (The Hill)

STERR LANE (E W). Named for the land owner in Maria Sterr's subdivision of 1891. (Marquette-Cherokee)

STEWART PLACE (N-S). Located in the private Stewart Place subdivision of 1888, it is named for the land owner and developer. The Stewart name originated in England meaning "keeper of the sty, pen, or hall, later manager of a household or estate." (Cabanne)

STOCKTON STREET (N-S). Originated in J.G. Bryan's Second subdivision of 1865, it honors Doctor Stockton, a physician who aided in the laying out of the Lowell Addition. It was First Street from Adelaide to Luther until 1881. (Hyde Park & Bissell -College Hill)

STODDARD STREET (E-W). Honored Henry Stoddard, real estate man and developer of the Stoddard's Addition, which he created in 1851. (Old North St. Louis-Yeatman)

STOLLE STREET (N-S). Originally Helvetia Street in the Helena Place Addition of 1904, it extended from Germania Street to the alley north of Primm Street. Helvetia was the Latin name for Switzerland. Renamed Stolle Street in 1952 for a local property owner. (Morganford)

STRATFORD AVENUE (E-W). In the Rydal Mount subdivision of 1893, it was named for Stratford-on-Avon, a municipal borough in Warwickshire, England, associated with William Shakespeare, and other English places of the same name. It was known as Frueh Avenue between 1893 and 1916. (Arlington) (Walnut Park)

STRODTMAN PLACE (N-S). Appearing in the 1873 subdivision of Bissell's Park, it was named for George W. Strodtman, a north side real estate man and developer. It was Twenty-first Street from Ferry to Grand until 1927. (Hyde Park & Bissell-College Hill)

STURGEON PLACE (N-S). Honored Isaac H. Sturgeon, who in 1855 became president of the North Missouri Railroad (later the Wabash Railroad). He was also a lawyer, real estate man and banker in St. Louis. The name first appeared in the subdivision of Bissell Park of 1873. (Hyde Park & Bissell-College Hill)

SUBLETTE AVENUE (N-S). Named in honor of William L. and Solomon B. Sublette, western fur traders who were landowners in Gratiot League Square. The street appeared on St. Louis maps dating back to the 1850s. Portions of it were also known as Cheltenham Avenue and Blue Ridge Road until 1881. It was Blue Ridge Road from Connecticut to Pernod until 1881. (The Hill) (Oakland) (Southwest)

SUBURBAN AVENUE (E-W). In Phillip E. Green's subdivision of 1892, it was so named for its then suburban location. (Cabanne)

SUGAR MAPLE KNOLL (E-W). The sugar maple is a variety of the maple tree (it is also known as the hard maple). This is the tree from which maple syrup is extracted. Its wood is also valuable as lumber. (Midtown)

SULLIVAN AVENUE (E-W). Located in the East Union Addition of 1850, it was named in honor of William Sullivan, an early settler in colonial St. Louis, who was appointed as a constable and coroner under American authority by Governor William Henry Harrison and later became a justice of the peace. It was named Lucas Street between Twelfth and Elliott until 1875. (Fairground) (Old North St. Louis-Yeatman)

SULLIVAN BOULEVARD (N-S). See
LEONOR K. SULLIVAN BOULEVARD (N-S).

SULPHUR AVENUE (N-S). Developed from a road leading to a sulphur spring in David W. Graham's Sulphur Spring tract. Until 1882, from Wilson to Manchester avenues, it was known as Cheltenham Avenue. (Clifton) (The Hill) (Oakland) (Southwest)

SUMMIT DRIVE. A drive in Forest Park, it takes its name from the high elevation it traverses. (Kingsbury)

SUMMIT PLACE (N-S). In the 1920 private subdivision of A.B. Finch. Its name refers to the highest point of a mountain. (Walnut Park)

SUNSHINE DRIVE (E-W). Originally Upton Street in the Gravois Homesites Subdivision Number Three of 1923, it received its present name in 1933. It is also known as Sunshine Drive in the Morganford Gardens Subdivision of 1949. (Morganford) (Southwest)

SUSANVIEW COURT (N-S). Appearing in the 1963 Joanne Terrace Subdivision, named for a female relative of the developer. (Southwest)

SUSON PLACE (E-W) AND COURT (N-S). "Suson" is a variant of "Susson" which is descended from "Susan," meaning "a lily." Appeared first in the Hampton Gardens Apartments subdivision of 1950. (The Hill)

SUTHERLAND AVENUE (E-W). Named for a maritime county in northern Scotland in the 1896 Southampton Subdivision. "Sutherland" is Scottish for "Southern land." (Southwest)

SWAN AVENUE (E-W). When McRee City was platted in 1869, William B. Swan was associated with the Hiram Leffingwell Company, which laid out the subdivision. In 1867 Swan developed another subdivision in south St. Louis. (Shaw)

SWERINGEN AVENUE. (E-W) Part of the John J. O'Fallon estate subdivision of 1870, it honors James L. Sweringen, a landowner in the vicinity. (Baden-Riverview)

SWITZER AVENUE (E-W). Originating in the 1859 Railroad Addition to Germantown, it is named for Mary J. Switzer, a daughter of Doctor William H. Jennings. (Baden-Riverview)

Back to Street Index


HOME | KIDZONE | CATALOG | CONTACT US | SEARCH | HINTS