ST. LOUIS PUBLIC LIBRARY
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Fall 2003
A Publication of the St. Louis Public Library

Vol. 3   No. 4

THEY CAME FROM… Canada!
They Came From… highlights dates in the history of a particular place which are of interest to the genealogist. It will also list addresses of institutions holding public records of that state or country.


A TIME LINE OF EVENTS FROM 1763-1945

 

1763 France loses its Canadian land holdings to the British in the Treaty of Paris, which ends the Seven Years War (French and Indian War).
1774 British Parliament enacts Quebec Act, which extends boundaries of Quebec as far as the Ohio River Valley. The Act recognizes the Roman Catholic Church and acknowledges the right of the Church to collect tithes. Canadian subjects would henceforth be governed by French civil law and English criminal law. However, the Act fails to create an elected legislative assembly.
1783 Settlers (known as Loyalists in the U.S., Tories in Canada) leave the U.S. for Canada after America gains independence from Great Britain. Approximately 35,000 United Empire Loyalists settle in Nova Scotia, another 5,000 on land north of Lake Ontario.
1791 British Parliament enacts the Constitutional Act, which splits Quebec into provinces of Upper and Lower Canada. Each province is to be governed by a legislative council appointed for life and a legislative assembly to be elected by the people.
1801 National Archives of Canada holds records of immigrant settlers and passenger lists for the period 1801-1849. A card index known as the Miscellaneous Immigration Index covers these records. (www.ingeneas.com/free/main.html)
1812-1814 Canadian Armed Forces repel several American invasion attempts during the War of 1812.
1834 Slavery is abolished in the British Empire. Canada becomes a favored destination for fugitive American slaves traveling north via the Underground Railroad.
1840 The Act of Union, which becomes effective in 1841, is enacted by the British Parliament. This act joins Upper and Lower Canada (which will now be known as Canada West and Canada East, respectively) under a central government and will have an appointed legislative council and an elected legislative assembly.
1851 Census provides age, sex, country or province of birth, religion, ethnic origin, occupation, marital status & education.
1861 Census provides age, sex, country or province of birth, religion, ethnic origin, occupation, marital status & education.
1866 American Fenians (pro-Irish revolutionaries) make two incursions into Canada but are driven back by the Canadian militia.
1867 New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Canada East (Quebec), and Canada West (Ontario) are united into the Dominion of Canada under the British North America Act enacted by the British Parliament.
1869 Civil registration of vital records begins in Ontario. Copies are available from the Archives of Ontario for births, 1869-1903; marriages, 1869-1918; and deaths, 1869-1928. Vital records for later years are maintained by the Registrar General in Thunder Bay.
1870 Canadian government enacts the Western Lands Act, which offers potential settlers 160 acres of land for a $10 fee in the western parts of Alberta, Manitoba, and Saskatchewan to encourage settlement of that area.
1870 American Fenians make another incursion into Canada but are driven back by the Canadian militia. U.S. authorities arrest the ringleaders in an effort to show Canadian officials that the U.S. government, which had backed attempts to invade Canada during the American Revolution and the War of 1812, has taken no part in Fenian activities.
1871 Census provides age, sex, country or province of birth, religion, ethnic origin, occupation, marital status & education.
1871 American Fenians, who seize a Hudson Bay Company trading post in Manitoba, are pursued and arrested by U.S. troops.
1872 Civil registration of vital records begins in British Columbia. Copies are available from the Vital Statistics Office in Victoria.
1881 Census provides age, sex, country or province of birth, religion, ethnic origin, occupation, marital status & education.
1882 Civil registration of vital records begins in Manitoba. Copies are available from the Vital Statistics Office in Winnipeg.
1883 Annual Civil Service Lists (1883-1918) provide date of birth, rank, salary & date of appointment for federal employees.
1886 Civil registration of vital records begins in New Brunswick. Copies of births, 1886-1905, and marriages and deaths, 1888-1950, are available from the Provincial Archives. Later records can be obtained from the Vital Statistics Office in Fredericton.
1891 Census provides age, sex, country or province of birth, religion, ethnic origin, occupation, marital status & education.
1891 Civil registration of baptisms, marriages, and burials begins in Newfoundland and Labrador. Copies are available from the Provincial Archives of Newfoundland and Labrador in St. John's, Newfoundland. Civil registration of vital records begins in Saskatchewan. Copies are available from the Vital Statistics Unit in Regina. Immigrants crossing the border from Canada to the U.S. are recorded on the St. Albans Lists.
1898 Civil registration of vital records begins in Alberta. Copies are available from the Provincial Archives of Alberta for 1898-1905; later years from the Alberta Registries in Edmonton.
1900 Pre-1900 vital records of Quebec are in the custody of nine regional offices of the Archives Nationales du Quebec. Records 1900-present are kept at the Ministere de la Justice at Quebec City.
1901 Census provides age, sex, country or province of birth, date of birth, year of immigration, religion, ethnic origin, occupation, marital status, education & address or location of land.
1906 Civil registration of vital records begins for Prince Edward Island. Copies are available from the Health and Community Services Agency in Montague, Prince Edward Island.
1908 Civil registration of vital records begins in Nova Scotia. Copies are available from the Records Management Office in Halifax, Nova Scotia.
1914-1918 619,000 Canadians serve in the armed forces during the First World War. 60,000 (10%) are killed in action or mortally wounded. The province of Quebec offers the fiercest resistance of any Canadian province to proposals to conscript Canadian men for duty overseas.
1935 Federal election lists from this year to the present are maintained by the Chief Electoral Officer. These lists, which are available on microfilm, are arranged by electoral district. Use the Canadian Almanac to determine electoral districts.
1935 Records of immigrants arriving at Canadian land stations and seaports beginning in this year are in the custody of the Citizenship and Immigration Canada Office in Ottawa, Ontario.
1939-1945 39,000 Canadians are killed in action or mortally wounded during the Second World War. Approximately 50,000 Canadian women serve in the armed forces during WWII.

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