ST. LOUIS PUBLIC LIBRARY
PREMIER LIBRARY SOURCES
HOME KIDZONE CATALOG SEARCH BULLET


BULLET St. Louis Street Index
E - Street Names


Following is a list of currently existing (1994) St. Louis city streets which was compiled by Dr. Glen Holt and Thomas A. Pearson. Entries are alphabetical by street name, and include information on street orientation (east-west, north-south), street name origin, dedication date, and neighborhood(s) through which the street runs (when known).

EADS AVENUE (E-W). Received its present name in 1874 to honor Captain James B. Eads, the builder of Eads Bridge which was opened in that year. When the thoroughfare was first dedicated as a public way in 1854, it was called Susan Street, after a daughter of James S. Thomas, who platted Compton Hill. (Compton Hill)

EADS BRIDGE. Has its own zip code (63102) and post office address. (Central Business District)

EAST BLOW STREET. See BLOW STREET (E-W).

EAST BOWEN STREET. See BOWEN STREET (E-W).

EAST CATALAN STREET. See CATALAN STREET (E-W).

EAST CLARENCE AVENUE. See CLARENCE STREET (E-W).

EAST COLLEGE AVENUE. See COLLEGE AVENUE (E-W).

EAST COURT (N-S). A short street in the Kingshighway Forest Subdivision of 1928 on Holly Hills avenue west of Gravois. (Oak Hill)

EAST COURTOIS STREET. See COURTOIS STREET (E-W).

EAST DAVIS STREET. See DAVIS STREET (E-W).

EAST DOVER STREET. See DOVER STREET (E-W).

EAST EICHELBERGER STREET. See EICHELBERGER STREET (E-W).

EAST ELWOOD AVENUE. See ELWOOD STREET (E-W).

EAST ESPENSCHIED STREET. See ESPENSCHIED STREET (E-W).

EAST FAIRFAX COURT. See FAIRFAX COURT (E-W).

EAST FILLMORE STREET. See FILLMORE STREET (E-W).

EAST FOURTEENTH STREET (E-W). That section of Fourteenth which extends from Biddle Street to Mullanphy. North of Mullanphy it becomes Fourteenth. See Also FOURTEENTH STREET (E,N,& S).

EAST GATE AVENUE. See EASTGATE AVENUE (E-W).

EAST GRAND AVENUE. See GRAND AVENUE (E).

EAST GRAND BOULEVARD. See GRAND BOULEVARD (E,N,& S).

EAST HAVEN STREET. See HAVEN STREET (E-W).

EAST HILL STREET. See HILL STREET (E-W).

EAST HOLLY HILLS STREET. See HOLLY HILLS AVENUE & BOULEVARD (E-W) for explanation.

EAST HURCK STREET. See HURCK STREET (E-W).

EAST IOWA AVENUE. See IOWA AVENUE (E-W).

EAST IRON STREET. See IRON STREET (E-W).

EAST JAMIESON AVENUE. See JAMIESON AVENUE (E-W).

EAST KOELN STREET. See KOELN STREET (E-W).

EAST KRAUSS STREET. See KRAUSS STREET (E-W).

EAST LOOKOUT COURT. See LOOKOUT COURT & DRIVE (E-W).

EAST LOOKOUT DRIVE (E-W). See LOOKOUT COURT & DRIVE (E-W) for explanation. (Baden-Riverview)

EAST LOUGHBOROUGH AVENUE. See LOUGHBOROUGH AVENUE (E-W).

EAST MAEDER STREET. See MAEDER STREET (E-W).

EAST MARCEAU STREET. See MARCEAU STREET (E-W).

EAST MICHIGAN AVENUE. See MICHIGAN AVENUE for explanation (N-S).

EAST MOTT STREET. See MOTT STREET (E-W),

EAST NAGEL AVENUE. See NAGEL AVENUE (E-W).

EAST NORWOOD DRIVE. See NORWOOD AVENUE, DRIVE, & COURT (E-W).

EAST POEPPING STREET. See POEPPING STREET (E-W)

EAST PRAIRIE AVENUE. See PRAIRIE AVENUE (E-W)

EAST PRIMM STREET. See PRIMM STREET (E-W).

EAST QUINCY STREET. See QUINCY STREET (E-W).

EAST RAILROAD AVENUE (N-S). Paralleled the North Missouri Railroad tracks as part of the 1856 Railroad Addition to Germantown. (Baden-Riverview)

EAST ROAD (N-S). The original name of this street (it was part of the 1852 subdivision of Gratiot Square). (Oakland)

EAST ROBERT AVENUE. See
ROBERT AVENUE (E-W).

EAST SCHIRMER STREET. See SCHIRMER STREET (E-W).

EAST SOPER STREET. See SOPER STREET (E-W).

EAST STEINS STREET. See STEINS STREET (E-W).

EAST TAYLOR AVENUE (E-W). The portion of Taylor east of West Florissant to the Mississippi River. See TAYLOR AVENUE (E,N,& S) for full definition.

EAST TESSON STREET. See TESSON STREET (E-W).

EAST THIRD STREET. See THIRD STREET (E,N,& S).

EAST UPTON STREET. See UPTON STREET ((E-W).

EAST VIRGINIA AVENUE. See VIRGINIA AVENUE (E-W, N-S).

EAST VIVIAN AVENUE. See VIVIAN AVENUE (N-S).

EAST WALSH STREET. See WALSH STREET (E-W).

EAST WARNE AVENUE. See WARNE AVENUE (E-W).

EASTGATE AVENUE (E-W). Marks the location of the east gate to the old Delmar Gardens Amusement Park and race track. (Cabanne)

EASTON AVENUE (E-W). Honored Rufus Easton, who was named St. Louis' first postmaster in 1805. He also served as Missouri's first attorney general and gained recognition as one of the leading lawyers of his day. The name Easton still occasionally appears on city street maps although Easton Avenue is now known as Dr. Martin Luther King Drive. (Old North St. Louis-Yeatman)

ECOFF AVENUE (N-S). Asa B. Ecoff, then city inspector of boilers, was honored by this street in Balson's Subdivision of 1885. (Oakland)

EDELLE AVENUE (E-S). Feminine spelling of "Edel" or "Edelle," English for "descendant of Edel (noble); the nobleman". Developed in Dougherty's Goodfellow Avenue private subdivision of 1907. (Arlington)

EDMUND AVENUE (N-S). Name of a 9th-century saint, king of the East Angles, whose popularity helped the name survive the Norman Conquest. It translates from the Old English as "rich protector." Opened in the 1866 subdivision of the Briggs Estate. (Central West End)

EDNA STREET (N-S). From "the Hebrew ednah" meaning "pleasure, delight." In the 1905 subdivision of Hornsby Heights. (Baden-Riverview)

EDWARDS STREET (N-S). In the Fairmont Heights Subdivision of 1868, it honors Albert Gallatin Edwards, a Civil War general and assistant United States Treasurer at St. Louis. He was the founder of the banking and brokerage house of of A. G. Edwards and Company. (The Hill)

EDWIN STREET (N-S). From the Old English name "Edwine" meaning "happy friend." (Midtown)

EICHELBERGER DRIVE (E-W). Platted in the Villa Nova Subdivision in 1946. Like its predecessor, it honors Doctor George F. Eichelberger. (Southwest)

EICHELBERGER STREET (E-W). Originally named in an early platting of the Carondelet Commons in honor of Doctor George F. Eichelberger, a member of Carondelet's first city council. From Morganford Road to the River des Peres, it was Clark Road until 1881. (Marquette-Cherokee) (Oak Hill) (Southwest)

EIGHTEENTH STREET (N-S). This street came into existence in the mid-1830s as Tayon Avenue, the spelled-as-pronounced name of Joseph Taillon, an original French settler who in 1765 built a dam to power the city's first flour mill at the east end of Mill Creek Valley. In Old North St. Louis, it was Nineteenth Street from Washington to North Market Street until 1883. South of downtown, from Chouteau to Sidney Street, it was known as Second Carondelet Avenue until 1883. (Benton Park) (Downtown) (Lafayette Square) (Old North St. Louis-Yeatman) (Soulard)

EIGHTH STREET (N-S). One of the first additions to St. Louis west of the 1822 city limits was the John B. C. Lucas subdivision of 1833. In its street layout, the next parallel street west of Seventh Street was designated as Eighth Street. This street's southern extension into Soulard was known as Fulton Street until l883. (Downtown) (Old North St. Louis-Yeatman) (Soulard)

EILER STREET (E W). Originally "A-N1 Street" in the old town of Carondelet, this street was given the name of Adams Street during the 1850s and was changed to Eiler Street in 1881 to honor Laurentius M. Eiler, who made the survey of the town of Carondelet in 1832. (Marquette-Cherokee) (Oak Hill)

EITMAN AVENUE (E-W). The German "Eit" is descended from "Eid", meaning fire, burn or hearth. Appeared in Eitman's Addition of 1890 and named for the family of the developer. (Clifton)

ELENORE AVENUE (N-S). A section of this street from Gravois Avenue to Eichelberger Street in the 1906 Humboldt Heights Subdivision was named Elenore Avenue until 1932 when the name was changed to Christy Avenue. The original name probably honored a female relative of the developer. Between Delor Street and Wilcox Avenue, in the Kingshighway Terrace Subdivision of 1922, it also was named Elenore until 1932 when it became Christy. The name of Elenore was restored in 1937. (Oak Hill)

ELEVENTH STREET (N-S). First appeared on the map of St. Louis in the plat of the John B. C. Lucas Third Addition of 1841. The section of the street between Clark and Elm was named Coursault Street in the Joseph Charless Addition of 1835 but had reverted in Eleventh by 1850. Between Gratiot Street and Chouteau Avenue, it was named Beckwith Street from 1865 to 1881. In Hyde Park, this street was known as Belleview Street from Bellefontaine Road to Gano Avenue to 1883. In the Soulard neighborhood, various sections of this street were named Rosatti, Menard and Stoddard before l883. (Downtown) (Hyde Park & Bissell - College Hill) (Old North St. Louis-Yeatman) (Soulard)

ELIAS AVENUE (E-W). "Greek form of Hebrew Elijah, `The Lord is God'." Appeared in McDermott's Addition to Baden of 1905, it is said to be associated with the settlement of a Jewish colony in the area in earlier years. (Baden-Riverview)

ELIZABETH AVENUE (E-W). Originally appeared on St. Louis street maps in 1878 in the subdivisions of property of Gabriel Jones and others. Elizabeth traces its origin to the Hebrew Elisheba, "possibly `oath of God' or `God is satisfaction/perfection'." In the Biblical Old Testemant, the Book of Exodus, Elizabeth was the wife of Aaron. (Clifton)

ELLA AVENUE (E-W). John A. Watson named this street in his 1874 subdivision of Fruit Hill. During the 1870s, Ella came back into common usage, probably as a pet form of Eleanor. (Cabanne)

ELLENDALE AVENUE (N-S). Located in the 1884 subdivision of Ellendale, it honors Ellen, the daughter of St. Louis publisher and author William L. Thomas, who developed the subdivision. (Oakland)

ELLENDALE PLACE (E-W). Platted in the 1886 amended plat of Ellendale. Like the earlier avenue of the same name, it honors Ellen, the daughter of William L. Thomas. (Oakland)

ELLENWOOD AVENUE (E-W). Appeared in the Ellenwood Park Subdivision of 1909, this street and the subdivision were named in honor of Mrs. Ellen P. Christy, widow of the founder of the fire clay products company. It combines her name, Ellen, with "wood" to denote the original wooded area of this section prior to development. (Oak Hill)

ELLIOTT AVENUE (N-S). Named in honor of Richard Smith Elliott, a real estate man and partner of Hiram W. Leffingwell, in the Stoddard Addition of 1851. (Fairground) (Old North St. Louis-Yeatman)

ELMBANK AVENUE (E-W). Took its name for a plateau with a stand of elm trees in the 1890 Magnolia Terrace subdivision. It was named McCaffery Place from Cora to Marcus until 1929. (Arlington)

ELMER AVENUE (N-S). A very popular male name at the end of the 19th century, Elmer originated in the Old English Aethelmaer meaning "noble" or "famous". Appeared in the 1910 Hadley Park Subdivision. Elmer is not a popular place name in the United States, although there is a town named Elmer in Macon County, Missouri. (Southwest)

ELWARD AVENUE (E-W). The family name Elward comes from both German and English origins as "descendant of Aylward," meaning "noble or awe or elf, guard". Appeared in Dougherty's Goodfellow Avenue private subdivision of 1907. (Arlington)

ELWOOD STREET (E W) This was E Street in the town of Carondelet. It received its present name in 1854 to honor Elwood Miller, brother of Carondelet mayor Madison Miller. (Carondelet)

EMERSON AVENUE (N-S). Ralph Waldo Emerson, (1808-1882), American poet, essayist and philosopher, was honored by this street in the 1906 subdivision of West Harney Heights. (Walnut Park)

EMILIE STREET (E-W). The French form of Emily, which is from the Latin Aemilia, femine of amilius, the name of a Roman . . . clan." Originated in the Ellendale Subdivision of 1884. (Oakland)

EMILY STREET (N-S). Named for a daughter of Doctor John Gano Bryan in the College Hill subdivision of 1859. It was Curran Street from Prairie to Warne until 1883. (Hyde Park & Bissell -College Hill)

EMMA AVENUE (E-W). In the 1888 subdivision of Jennings Heights it was named for a daughter of the Jennings family. The name goes back to Emma, queen to Ethelred the Unready and later to King Canute. (Walnut Park)

EMMET STREET (E-W). Ward 7, Precinct 6 & 7. From the Hebrew word "emet" meaning truth. (Soulard)

ENRIGHT AVENUE (E-W). Previously known along some of its sections as Morgan Street, Hogan Avenue and Von Versen Avenue, this street was named in honor of Alice Von Verson, a daughter of Mrs. Eliza Clemens, in her 1885 subdivision of Clemens Place. From Grand Boulevard west to the city limits, the street name was changed during the anti-German hysteria of 1918, to honor Jack Enright, one of the first Americans killed in World War I. (Cabanne) (Clifton) (Grand Prairie)

ERA AVENUE (N-S). In the Coshocton Heights subdivision of 1911, it was named for the new era presented by the twentieth century. (Walnut Park)

ESPENSCHIED STREET (E W). Named for the Espenschied family, early German settlers in Carondelet who were famous as manufacturers of high quality covered wagons used to carry settlers to California. (Carondelet)

ESPLANADE STEEET (E-W). In the Greenwood Subdivision of 1891, it was named for Esplanade Avenue, a prominent street in New Orleans. An esplanade is any large open space, especially one serving as a public walk or drive. (Oakland)

ESSEX PLACE (E-W). In the Essex Place private subdivision of 1961, it was named by the developer. Essex is a county in southeastern England. It is a popular name for counties, appearing in no less than five states along with towns in Connecticut, Maryland and Vermont. (Fairground)

ESTHER AVENUE (N-S). Originates in the Persian word for star, meaning the planet Venus. It also is a Biblical Old Testement name. Showed up in Campbell's Subdivision of 1889. (Clifton)

ETHEL AVENUE (E-W). Had its beginning as a pet form of various Old English names like Ethelinda and Ethelberta. In each case, Ethel meant "noble". Occurred first in the 1910 subdivision of Justin Place. (Oakland)

ETON LANE (N-S). Appearing in the Inglesyde subdivision of 1890, it is named after an urban district in Buckinghamshire, England, that is known as the location of Eton College. (Baden-Riverview)

ETZEL AVENUE (E-W) and TERRACE (N-S). In the 1885 subdivision of Gambleton, it was named for Susan R. Etzel, the land owner. Un-til 1881, it was named Gay Avenue from Page to Hodiamont. (Cabanne)

EUCLID AVENUE (N-S). Originally known as Lake, Lay and Carolina in various sections of Grand Prairie, this street was named Euclid Avenue in 1881-82 as part of a city-wide scheme to avoid street name duplications for mail delivery. The name is a transplant from the famed Euclid Avenue in Cleveland, Ohio, and the nearby town of the same name that originated in 1798. The most famous Euclid, of course, was the Greek geometrician and educator at Alexandria about 300 BC. (Central West End) (Grand Prairie) (Fairground) (Walnut Park)

EUCLID TERRACE (E-W). A short segment along the old Hodiamont streetcar line right-of-way, it is named for a large apartment building, the Euclid Terrace Apartments, located at the southeast corner of Euclid Avenue and the old car line. Although not listed on the official city street map, this steet name designation has been on St. Louis maps for many decades. (Grand Prairie)

EUGENE AVENUE (N-S). Memorializes the St. Louis-born poet, Eugene Field, in a subdivision platted by his father, Roswell M. Field, in 1872. (Morganford)

EUGENIA STREET (E-W). A one-block-long street which appeared in the 1845 West End Addition by Louis A. LaBeaume and Archibald Gamble, it was named for one of their favorite relatives. Eugenia is the femine form of Eugene from the Greek Eugenious, that in turn came from an adjective meaning "well-born." (*Downtown) (Midtown)

EUREKA PLACE (N-S). This block-long, one-time private street was named for "Eureka," the state motto of California which entered the union as part of the Compromise of 1850. The street originated as a private subdivision partitioned in 1871. The exclamation, translated "I have found (it)," is attributed to Archimedes (287?-212 B.C.), Greek mathematician and inventor, when he discovered a method for determining the purity of gold. Although hard to find because of a lack of street signs, the thoroughfare still exists on the city's official street map. (Grand Prairie)

EVANS AVENUE (E-W). East of Grand Avenue, Evans originated in Old North St. Louis-Yeatman, as a street in Daniel D. Page's Third Western Addition to St. Louis of 1855, honoring A.H. Evans, landowner and developer of Evans Place subdivision in U.S. Survey 1461. West of Grand it had its beginning in Grand Prairie as the principal street in the Evans Place subdivision, a 12-block development north of Page between Prairie and Taylor Avenues dedicated to urban settlement by David F. Evans and Montgoery Blair in 1872. Between Deer Street and Marcus Avenue, the street's name was changed from Lewis Avenue to Evans Avenue in 1881. (Grand Prairie) (Old North St. Louis-Yeatman)

EVELINE STREET (E-W. Appeared in Thomas Campbell's Subdivision of 1889. The name originated in the Old German Avelina and had grown popular in Norman times in England. (Clifton)

EVERGREEN PLACE (N-S). In the 1908 Kreikenbaum private subdivision, it was named for evergreen trees. The Kreikenbaums operated a wholesale paper company. (Oakland)

EWING AVENUE (N-S). Laid out as part of the Stoddard Addition of 1851, it was named for Thomas Ewing, a member of a prominent St. Louis family and a Union Army general in the Civil War. (Midtown)

Back to Street Index


HOME | KIDZONE | CATALOG | CONTACT US | SEARCH | HINTS